A recombinant vaccine based on i-Particles is protective against H1N1 influenza infection

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A recombinant vaccine based on i-Particles is protective against H1N1 influenza infection

Tetrahymena cell

Recombinant Haemagglutinin Derived From the Ciliated Protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila Is Protective Against Influenza Infection

Context
Cilian AG (Germany), affiliated as well as Adjuvatis, to the European consortium ADITEC, lead the production of a recombinant influenza haemagglutinin, using the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. Combined with NOD2 i-Particles, this H1N1 recombinant vaccine is protective against influenza protection.

Abstract
Current influenza vaccines manufactured using eggs have considerable limitations, both in terms of scale up production and the potential impact passaging through eggs can have on the antigenicity of the vaccine virus strains. Alternative methods of manufacture are required, particularly in the context of an emerging pandemic strain. Here we explore the production of recombinant influenza haemagglutinin using the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. For the first time we were able to produce haemagglutinin from both seasonal influenza A and B strains. This ciliate derived material was immunogenic, inducing an antibody response in both mice and non-human primates. Mice immunized with ciliate derived haemagglutinin were protected against challenge with homologous influenza A or B viruses. The antigen could also be combined with submicron particles containing a Nod2 ligand, significantly boosting the immune response and reducing the dose of antigen required. Thus, we show that Tetrahymena can be used as a manufacturing platform for viral vaccine antigens.

Author affiliations
Cilian AG, Munster, Germany.
Department of Infectious Disease, St Mary’s Campus, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
VisMederi s.r.l., Siena, Italy.
CEA-Université Paris Sud 11-INSERM U1184, Immunology of Viral Infections and Autoimmune Diseases, IDMIT Department, IBFJ, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.
Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et d’Ingénierie Thérapeutique, UMR 5305, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, IBCP, Lyon, France.
Adjuvatis, Lyon, France.

Front. Immunol., 13 November 2019 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.02661

Main contribution of Adjuvatis
Combination of Antigen With Nod2 Particles Enables Dose Sparing (0.015 µg of protein per dose)

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